Is There Such A Thing As A Collapsible Compound Bow?

as in a bow that can be easily folded in, using something like locking pins to hold it in place?



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8 thoughts on “Is There Such A Thing As A Collapsible Compound Bow?”

  1. Not a chance! With all the pulleys and the already taught string there is no way you could make one collapsible.
    Be a man and buy a Bear Recurve Bow. They are collapsible.
    I only say that because I can’t hit crap with a compound bow but I can put 10 out of 10 in a paper plate at 70 yards with a Recurve.

  2. No. It would be possible to take it down(you might get hurt in the process), but putting it back together is the big problem. The force that the limbs are under, being pulled towards each other by the cables and strings, would make it impossible to restring it without a bow press. So in order to have a take down bow, you need a bow press. They make portable ones. So yes it is possible but you would need a portable bow press if you want to take it anywhere. You would have to put the press on, then take off the cables and string, then take off the limbs. Then to put it back on you would have to put the libs back on and then restring it, it is possible, but a huge pain in the ***.

  3. If there are I’ve never seen one. It’s really a bad idea with the amount of torque they produce. If someone did I can’t see how you’d reconcile the little bit of slop you’d have with accurate sighting. Archery is tough enough without introducing another variable into accurate shooting. But that’s just what I think.

  4. Not in the world of compound bows. But in the recurve line up there are several models that are take- downs that the limbs unscrew from the riser and can be took down and put back together in seconds.It would be best to use one of those. Bear Archery was the first to come out with a take down model.

  5. I’m sure that with a bit of research you’ll find one. Nearly everything else is collapsible. Especially in the camping world.
    Peace.

  6. the very nature of how a compound works leaves drastic engineering issues that limit this possibility—try a crossbow

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